“Because one believes in oneself, one doesn’t try to convince others. Because one is content with oneself, one doesn’t need others’ approval. Because one accepts oneself, the whole world accepts him or her.”
— Lao Tzu (via purplebuddhaproject)

(via purplebuddhaproject)

exhibition-ism:

Murals by Hell’O Monsters in Bari, Italy. exhibition-ism:

Murals by Hell’O Monsters in Bari, Italy. exhibition-ism:

Murals by Hell’O Monsters in Bari, Italy. exhibition-ism:

Murals by Hell’O Monsters in Bari, Italy.
nsorommaglobal:

selected pieces from Louder Than Words Series by Barbara Walker "The artist began this series as a result of her son Solomon’s experiences with police: Between 2002 and 2006, aged between 17 and 21, the black artist Barbara Walker’s son Solomon was so often “stopped and searched” by the Birmingham police that it came to seem disproportionately significant and she began to record the situations in her artwork. At the end of each search, Solomon was presented with a yellow A5 copy of the official police form recording the questioning. The forms, combined with newspaper cuttings of seemingly racially motivated events, sketches of city sites and meticulously drawn portraits, now become the main background focus of Walker’s graphic “Louder Than Words” collages. It is this contrast, between officialdom’s authoritative and…dehumanising paperwork on the one hand, and a mother’s quite exquisitely sensitive recording of her son’s particular features on the other, that affords the series a rare poignancy.”Barbara Walker - Brighter Future - Diptych, 2006, charcoal and conte on paper, 81 x 101cm
Barbara Walker - Series - … I can paint a picture with a pin - 2006, digital print media, 81 x 106 cm
Barbara Walker - Sol - 2007, charcoal on paper, 81 x 106cm
Barbara Walker - Time - 2009, mixed media on paper, 40 x 55cm
Barbara Walker - Untitled - 2006, digital mixed media print, 81 x 106cm









nsorommaglobal:

selected pieces from Louder Than Words Series by Barbara Walker "The artist began this series as a result of her son Solomon’s experiences with police: Between 2002 and 2006, aged between 17 and 21, the black artist Barbara Walker’s son Solomon was so often “stopped and searched” by the Birmingham police that it came to seem disproportionately significant and she began to record the situations in her artwork. At the end of each search, Solomon was presented with a yellow A5 copy of the official police form recording the questioning. The forms, combined with newspaper cuttings of seemingly racially motivated events, sketches of city sites and meticulously drawn portraits, now become the main background focus of Walker’s graphic “Louder Than Words” collages. It is this contrast, between officialdom’s authoritative and…dehumanising paperwork on the one hand, and a mother’s quite exquisitely sensitive recording of her son’s particular features on the other, that affords the series a rare poignancy.”Barbara Walker - Brighter Future - Diptych, 2006, charcoal and conte on paper, 81 x 101cm
Barbara Walker - Series - … I can paint a picture with a pin - 2006, digital print media, 81 x 106 cm
Barbara Walker - Sol - 2007, charcoal on paper, 81 x 106cm
Barbara Walker - Time - 2009, mixed media on paper, 40 x 55cm
Barbara Walker - Untitled - 2006, digital mixed media print, 81 x 106cm









nsorommaglobal:

selected pieces from Louder Than Words Series by Barbara Walker "The artist began this series as a result of her son Solomon’s experiences with police: Between 2002 and 2006, aged between 17 and 21, the black artist Barbara Walker’s son Solomon was so often “stopped and searched” by the Birmingham police that it came to seem disproportionately significant and she began to record the situations in her artwork. At the end of each search, Solomon was presented with a yellow A5 copy of the official police form recording the questioning. The forms, combined with newspaper cuttings of seemingly racially motivated events, sketches of city sites and meticulously drawn portraits, now become the main background focus of Walker’s graphic “Louder Than Words” collages. It is this contrast, between officialdom’s authoritative and…dehumanising paperwork on the one hand, and a mother’s quite exquisitely sensitive recording of her son’s particular features on the other, that affords the series a rare poignancy.”Barbara Walker - Brighter Future - Diptych, 2006, charcoal and conte on paper, 81 x 101cm
Barbara Walker - Series - … I can paint a picture with a pin - 2006, digital print media, 81 x 106 cm
Barbara Walker - Sol - 2007, charcoal on paper, 81 x 106cm
Barbara Walker - Time - 2009, mixed media on paper, 40 x 55cm
Barbara Walker - Untitled - 2006, digital mixed media print, 81 x 106cm









nsorommaglobal:

selected pieces from Louder Than Words Series by Barbara Walker "The artist began this series as a result of her son Solomon’s experiences with police: Between 2002 and 2006, aged between 17 and 21, the black artist Barbara Walker’s son Solomon was so often “stopped and searched” by the Birmingham police that it came to seem disproportionately significant and she began to record the situations in her artwork. At the end of each search, Solomon was presented with a yellow A5 copy of the official police form recording the questioning. The forms, combined with newspaper cuttings of seemingly racially motivated events, sketches of city sites and meticulously drawn portraits, now become the main background focus of Walker’s graphic “Louder Than Words” collages. It is this contrast, between officialdom’s authoritative and…dehumanising paperwork on the one hand, and a mother’s quite exquisitely sensitive recording of her son’s particular features on the other, that affords the series a rare poignancy.”Barbara Walker - Brighter Future - Diptych, 2006, charcoal and conte on paper, 81 x 101cm
Barbara Walker - Series - … I can paint a picture with a pin - 2006, digital print media, 81 x 106 cm
Barbara Walker - Sol - 2007, charcoal on paper, 81 x 106cm
Barbara Walker - Time - 2009, mixed media on paper, 40 x 55cm
Barbara Walker - Untitled - 2006, digital mixed media print, 81 x 106cm









nsorommaglobal:

selected pieces from Louder Than Words Series by Barbara Walker "The artist began this series as a result of her son Solomon’s experiences with police: Between 2002 and 2006, aged between 17 and 21, the black artist Barbara Walker’s son Solomon was so often “stopped and searched” by the Birmingham police that it came to seem disproportionately significant and she began to record the situations in her artwork. At the end of each search, Solomon was presented with a yellow A5 copy of the official police form recording the questioning. The forms, combined with newspaper cuttings of seemingly racially motivated events, sketches of city sites and meticulously drawn portraits, now become the main background focus of Walker’s graphic “Louder Than Words” collages. It is this contrast, between officialdom’s authoritative and…dehumanising paperwork on the one hand, and a mother’s quite exquisitely sensitive recording of her son’s particular features on the other, that affords the series a rare poignancy.”Barbara Walker - Brighter Future - Diptych, 2006, charcoal and conte on paper, 81 x 101cm
Barbara Walker - Series - … I can paint a picture with a pin - 2006, digital print media, 81 x 106 cm
Barbara Walker - Sol - 2007, charcoal on paper, 81 x 106cm
Barbara Walker - Time - 2009, mixed media on paper, 40 x 55cm
Barbara Walker - Untitled - 2006, digital mixed media print, 81 x 106cm

nsorommaglobal:

selected pieces from Louder Than Words Series by Barbara Walker 

"The artist began this series as a result of her son Solomon’s experiences with police: 
Between 2002 and 2006, aged between 17 and 21, the black artist Barbara Walker’s son Solomon was so often “stopped and searched” by the Birmingham police that it came to seem disproportionately significant and she began to record the situations in her artwork. At the end of each search, Solomon was presented with a yellow A5 copy of the official police form recording the questioning. The forms, combined with newspaper cuttings of seemingly racially motivated events, sketches of city sites and meticulously drawn portraits, now become the main background focus of Walker’s graphic “Louder Than Words” collages. It is this contrast, between officialdom’s authoritative and…dehumanising paperwork on the one hand, and a mother’s quite exquisitely sensitive recording of her son’s particular features on the other, that affords the series a rare poignancy.”

Barbara Walker - 
Brighter Future - Diptych, 2006, charcoal and conte on paper, 81 x 101cm

Barbara Walker - Series - … I can paint a picture with a pin - 2006, digital print media, 81 x 106 cm

Barbara Walker - Sol - 2007, charcoal on paper, 81 x 106cm

Barbara Walker - Time - 2009, mixed media on paper, 40 x 55cm

Barbara Walker - Untitled - 2006, digital mixed media print, 81 x 106cm

(via iwakeupblack)

blvcknvy:

They made ​​fun of your name and you have changed your name.

They made ​​fun of your clothes and you changed clothes.

They made ​​fun of your hair and you have straighten your hair.

They made ​​fun of your skin and you bought skinn brighteners. 

They made ​​fun of your languages ​​and you have adopted their own.

They made ​​fun of your religion and you have embraced theirs.

Who taught you to hate the texture of your hair?

Who taught you to hate the color of your skin? to the extent that you bleach to be like the white man.

Who taught you to hate the shape of your nose and the shape of your lips?

Who taught you to hate the top of your head to the soles of your feet?

Who taught you to hate your being? to hate the land of your ancestors, to hate the race you belong to, such a point that you do not want to be next to each other.

When will we realize? When will be a humanity?

(via ericaleshai)

primadollly:

leptiir:theneighbourhoodsuperhero:



[shown above] Ruhal Ahmed, a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, in an interview in which he discusses Omar Khadr. Ahmed stammers,

“I think he was a strong kid.
I think, you know, being much older, much older than him, I did feel that, sometimes, I needed to look out for him and I think so did the other prisoners around him feel the same. But obviously, being in Guantanamo, you can’t really look out for one another.
Uh, it’s, it’s, it’s difficult you know, today I’m here, and I’m, I’m thinking of, thinking of him and he’s still in prison and he’s still, still a kid. I don’t know really what I would say to him. It doesn’t seem, it doesn’t seem fair that he’s still there and, and I’m here.”

Khadr, a Canadian, was taken into US custody at the age of fifteen, tortured and refused medical attention because he wouldn’t attest to being a member of Al Qaeda, even though he was shot three times in the chest and had shrapnel embedded in his eyes and right shoulder. As a result, Khadr’s left eye is now permanently blind, the vision in his right eye is deteriorating, he develops severe pain in his right shoulder when the temperature drops, and he suffers from extreme nightmares.
Ahmed, who was imprisoned in the cell next to him for some time, reported that Khadr would return from interrogations (where he would be tortured) crying and would huddle in a corner of his cell with his blanket over his head.
Shafiq Rasul, another former Guantanamo Bay detainee, stated that although Khadr was forced to mature due to his harsh treatment and torture, he still had the mentality of a child. Guantanamo Bay’s Muslim chaplain James Yee confirmed this by reporting that Khadr had been given a Mickey Mouse book in a surprising act of kindness by one of his interrogators, and that he slept with it clutched to his (injured) chest. Muneer Ahmad, one of Khadr’s first attorneys, reported that at their first meeting at Guantanamo, Khadr asked for nothing other than colouring books, car magazines and pictures of big animals and played with the attorney’s ink pens and digital watch.
Khadr has been incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay since 2002, and is now 27 years old.



More heartbreaking news: While Khadr is now out of Guantanamo and in a Canadian maximum security prison (which is not much better), he is currently being sued by a US soldier and the wife of a US soldier who was killed while arresting/torturing Khadr. These people are suing him for fifty million dollars because, while carrying out an attack against Khadr as child, they were injured.
Please keep Khadr and all of the other victims of this torture in your hearts
primadollly:

leptiir:theneighbourhoodsuperhero:



[shown above] Ruhal Ahmed, a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, in an interview in which he discusses Omar Khadr. Ahmed stammers,

“I think he was a strong kid.
I think, you know, being much older, much older than him, I did feel that, sometimes, I needed to look out for him and I think so did the other prisoners around him feel the same. But obviously, being in Guantanamo, you can’t really look out for one another.
Uh, it’s, it’s, it’s difficult you know, today I’m here, and I’m, I’m thinking of, thinking of him and he’s still in prison and he’s still, still a kid. I don’t know really what I would say to him. It doesn’t seem, it doesn’t seem fair that he’s still there and, and I’m here.”

Khadr, a Canadian, was taken into US custody at the age of fifteen, tortured and refused medical attention because he wouldn’t attest to being a member of Al Qaeda, even though he was shot three times in the chest and had shrapnel embedded in his eyes and right shoulder. As a result, Khadr’s left eye is now permanently blind, the vision in his right eye is deteriorating, he develops severe pain in his right shoulder when the temperature drops, and he suffers from extreme nightmares.
Ahmed, who was imprisoned in the cell next to him for some time, reported that Khadr would return from interrogations (where he would be tortured) crying and would huddle in a corner of his cell with his blanket over his head.
Shafiq Rasul, another former Guantanamo Bay detainee, stated that although Khadr was forced to mature due to his harsh treatment and torture, he still had the mentality of a child. Guantanamo Bay’s Muslim chaplain James Yee confirmed this by reporting that Khadr had been given a Mickey Mouse book in a surprising act of kindness by one of his interrogators, and that he slept with it clutched to his (injured) chest. Muneer Ahmad, one of Khadr’s first attorneys, reported that at their first meeting at Guantanamo, Khadr asked for nothing other than colouring books, car magazines and pictures of big animals and played with the attorney’s ink pens and digital watch.
Khadr has been incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay since 2002, and is now 27 years old.



More heartbreaking news: While Khadr is now out of Guantanamo and in a Canadian maximum security prison (which is not much better), he is currently being sued by a US soldier and the wife of a US soldier who was killed while arresting/torturing Khadr. These people are suing him for fifty million dollars because, while carrying out an attack against Khadr as child, they were injured.
Please keep Khadr and all of the other victims of this torture in your hearts

primadollly:

leptiir:theneighbourhoodsuperhero:

[shown above] Ruhal Ahmed, a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, in an interview in which he discusses Omar Khadr. Ahmed stammers,

“I think he was a strong kid.

I think, you know, being much older, much older than him, I did feel that, sometimes, I needed to look out for him and I think so did the other prisoners around him feel the same. But obviously, being in Guantanamo, you can’t really look out for one another.

Uh, it’s, it’s, it’s difficult you know, today I’m here, and I’m, I’m thinking of, thinking of him and he’s still in prison and he’s still, still a kid. I don’t know really what I would say to him. It doesn’t seem, it doesn’t seem fair that he’s still there and, and I’m here.”

Khadr, a Canadian, was taken into US custody at the age of fifteen, tortured and refused medical attention because he wouldn’t attest to being a member of Al Qaeda, even though he was shot three times in the chest and had shrapnel embedded in his eyes and right shoulder. As a result, Khadr’s left eye is now permanently blind, the vision in his right eye is deteriorating, he develops severe pain in his right shoulder when the temperature drops, and he suffers from extreme nightmares.

Ahmed, who was imprisoned in the cell next to him for some time, reported that Khadr would return from interrogations (where he would be tortured) crying and would huddle in a corner of his cell with his blanket over his head.

Shafiq Rasul, another former Guantanamo Bay detainee, stated that although Khadr was forced to mature due to his harsh treatment and torture, he still had the mentality of a child. Guantanamo Bay’s Muslim chaplain James Yee confirmed this by reporting that Khadr had been given a Mickey Mouse book in a surprising act of kindness by one of his interrogators, and that he slept with it clutched to his (injured) chest. Muneer Ahmad, one of Khadr’s first attorneys, reported that at their first meeting at Guantanamo, Khadr asked for nothing other than colouring books, car magazines and pictures of big animals and played with the attorney’s ink pens and digital watch.

Khadr has been incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay since 2002, and is now 27 years old.

More heartbreaking news: While Khadr is now out of Guantanamo and in a Canadian maximum security prison (which is not much better), he is currently being sued by a US soldier and the wife of a US soldier who was killed while arresting/torturing Khadr. These people are suing him for fifty million dollars because, while carrying out an attack against Khadr as child, they were injured.

Please keep Khadr and all of the other victims of this torture in your hearts

(via whitegirlsaintshit)

chervenkotka:


 


for you and me who experience artblock..keep on drawing!

chervenkotka:


 


for you and me who experience artblock..keep on drawing!

chervenkotka:


 


for you and me who experience artblock..keep on drawing!

chervenkotka:


 


for you and me who experience artblock..keep on drawing!

chervenkotka:


 


for you and me who experience artblock..keep on drawing!

chervenkotka:


 


for you and me who experience artblock..keep on drawing!

chervenkotka:

for you and me who experience artblock..
keep on drawing!

(via thievinggenius)

creativetime:


“I’m big on faces. I like to fill the frame with heads. I use faces as landscapes, as architecture. That always feels like the right place to start.”

Meet Bradford Young, one of the four featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn. A native of Louisville, Kentucky, the award-winning cinematographer moved to Chicago at age 15 to live with his father, where he received early artistic inspiration from the works of Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, and Aaron Douglas. Young studied film at Howard University, where he was influenced by Haile Gerima. He has been director of photography on feature films like Pariah (2011), Middle of Nowhere (2012), and Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (2013), and has won two cinematography awards at Sundance Film Festival.
Learn more about Bradford and the other artists featured in #FunkGodJazzMedicine. creativetime:


“I’m big on faces. I like to fill the frame with heads. I use faces as landscapes, as architecture. That always feels like the right place to start.”

Meet Bradford Young, one of the four featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn. A native of Louisville, Kentucky, the award-winning cinematographer moved to Chicago at age 15 to live with his father, where he received early artistic inspiration from the works of Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, and Aaron Douglas. Young studied film at Howard University, where he was influenced by Haile Gerima. He has been director of photography on feature films like Pariah (2011), Middle of Nowhere (2012), and Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (2013), and has won two cinematography awards at Sundance Film Festival.
Learn more about Bradford and the other artists featured in #FunkGodJazzMedicine. creativetime:


“I’m big on faces. I like to fill the frame with heads. I use faces as landscapes, as architecture. That always feels like the right place to start.”

Meet Bradford Young, one of the four featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn. A native of Louisville, Kentucky, the award-winning cinematographer moved to Chicago at age 15 to live with his father, where he received early artistic inspiration from the works of Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, and Aaron Douglas. Young studied film at Howard University, where he was influenced by Haile Gerima. He has been director of photography on feature films like Pariah (2011), Middle of Nowhere (2012), and Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (2013), and has won two cinematography awards at Sundance Film Festival.
Learn more about Bradford and the other artists featured in #FunkGodJazzMedicine. creativetime:


“I’m big on faces. I like to fill the frame with heads. I use faces as landscapes, as architecture. That always feels like the right place to start.”

Meet Bradford Young, one of the four featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn. A native of Louisville, Kentucky, the award-winning cinematographer moved to Chicago at age 15 to live with his father, where he received early artistic inspiration from the works of Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, and Aaron Douglas. Young studied film at Howard University, where he was influenced by Haile Gerima. He has been director of photography on feature films like Pariah (2011), Middle of Nowhere (2012), and Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (2013), and has won two cinematography awards at Sundance Film Festival.
Learn more about Bradford and the other artists featured in #FunkGodJazzMedicine. creativetime:


“I’m big on faces. I like to fill the frame with heads. I use faces as landscapes, as architecture. That always feels like the right place to start.”

Meet Bradford Young, one of the four featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn. A native of Louisville, Kentucky, the award-winning cinematographer moved to Chicago at age 15 to live with his father, where he received early artistic inspiration from the works of Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, and Aaron Douglas. Young studied film at Howard University, where he was influenced by Haile Gerima. He has been director of photography on feature films like Pariah (2011), Middle of Nowhere (2012), and Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (2013), and has won two cinematography awards at Sundance Film Festival.
Learn more about Bradford and the other artists featured in #FunkGodJazzMedicine. creativetime:


“I’m big on faces. I like to fill the frame with heads. I use faces as landscapes, as architecture. That always feels like the right place to start.”

Meet Bradford Young, one of the four featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn. A native of Louisville, Kentucky, the award-winning cinematographer moved to Chicago at age 15 to live with his father, where he received early artistic inspiration from the works of Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, and Aaron Douglas. Young studied film at Howard University, where he was influenced by Haile Gerima. He has been director of photography on feature films like Pariah (2011), Middle of Nowhere (2012), and Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (2013), and has won two cinematography awards at Sundance Film Festival.
Learn more about Bradford and the other artists featured in #FunkGodJazzMedicine.

creativetime:

“I’m big on faces. I like to fill the frame with heads. I use faces as landscapes, as architecture. That always feels like the right place to start.”

Meet Bradford Young, one of the four featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn. A native of Louisville, Kentucky, the award-winning cinematographer moved to Chicago at age 15 to live with his father, where he received early artistic inspiration from the works of Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, and Aaron Douglas. Young studied film at Howard University, where he was influenced by Haile Gerima. He has been director of photography on feature films like Pariah (2011), Middle of Nowhere (2012), and Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (2013), and has won two cinematography awards at Sundance Film Festival.

Learn more about Bradford and the other artists featured in #FunkGodJazzMedicine.

fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian youth wraps a bandolier of spent bullets, left by the Israeli army, near his destroyed home in Beit Hanoun on Aug. 11, 2014. (Hatem Moussa/AP)

(via mentalexodus)

neworleans-unknown:

thepeoplesrecord:

New Orleans PD shoots unarmed black man in the head, doesn’t report incident for 2 daysAugust 17, 2014
While most of the nation’s attention has been focused on the police shooting deaths of unarmed African Americans around the country — most notably Michael Brown and Ezell Ford — one story managed to slip under the media’s radar. News of a young African-American man shot in the head by a New Orleans police officer on Monday managed to go unreported because the police department never released details about the shooting.
The victim, identified as 26-year-old Armand Bennett, was shot in the head Monday during a traffic stop with a New Orleans police officer. He has been admitted to the intensive care unit of a local hospital. Armand’s attorney Nandi Campbell told UPTOWN via email, “My client was shot in the head and staples were required to close the wound.”
He was with his brother in a parked car, near the Tall Timbers subdivision, when officers confronted them with their guns drawn. Tall Timbers is a fairly affluent neighborhood, where Armand’s brother is a resident. The brother reported that a female officer fired two shots at them.
Campbell also tell us, ”He was not armed. After the first [shot], Armand started running toward his brother’s home. He was fired upon again as he was running. I’m unclear about whether he was in car when first shot was fired, but he was close to the car when the first shot happened.”
The story was first reported on Monday, which had a bare bones report that an “officer needs assistance” call was placed on the 3700 block of Mimosa Ct. in Algiers, a community in New Orleans. The NOPD reported an officer, recently identified as Officer Lisa Lewis, suffered a minor injury to her right hand during a scuffle with a combative suspect around 1:30 a.m. Details were not released that anyone had been shot or what the confrontation was about.
Campbell said there is an ongoing investigation into her client’s ordeal. At this time, Bennett has been charged with five outstanding warrants, including illegal possession of a weapon, resisting an officer (Gretna, LA), resisting an officer (New Orleans), possession of marijuana, and criminal damage to property, according to WWLTV.
A public records request for information fell on deaf ears over at the NOPD until Wednesday evening when the following statement was released:
On Sunday, August 10, 2014, around 1:19 a.m., a Fourth District NOPD officer was conducting a traffic stop in the 3700 block of Mimosa Drive. During the traffic stop, the officer was injured and the suspect, 26-year-old Armand Bennett was shot.
New Orleans Police Department Superintendent Ronal Serpas publicly apologized on Wednesday for taking two days to release details about the shooting. “In this particular case it’s a complete snafu on the part of my team. I take responsibility for it, I apologize for it, and I don’t want it to happen again,” said Serpas. He said that a press release was prepared on Monday, but somehow slipped through the cracks.
“I find it simply unacceptable to you and to the public that our office failed to get the information out,” Serpas added.
After the information was made public Wednesday evening,  Campbell had this to say via email, “Normally traffic stops do not include officers approaching the car with guns drawn. [The NOPD] Chief cannot decide if it was a traffic stop or if [the] officer stopped my client because she was aware of [the] outstanding warrant.”
She continues, “According to my client and his brother, there was no tussle, wrestling, or physical altercation with my client and the officer. They totally dispute the statement made by the chief.”
Photo credit: Bennett Family
Source


Please spread this..

neworleans-unknown:

thepeoplesrecord:

New Orleans PD shoots unarmed black man in the head, doesn’t report incident for 2 days
August 17, 2014

While most of the nation’s attention has been focused on the police shooting deaths of unarmed African Americans around the country — most notably Michael Brown and Ezell Ford — one story managed to slip under the media’s radar. News of a young African-American man shot in the head by a New Orleans police officer on Monday managed to go unreported because the police department never released details about the shooting.

The victim, identified as 26-year-old Armand Bennett, was shot in the head Monday during a traffic stop with a New Orleans police officer. He has been admitted to the intensive care unit of a local hospital. Armand’s attorney Nandi Campbell told UPTOWN via email, “My client was shot in the head and staples were required to close the wound.”

He was with his brother in a parked car, near the Tall Timbers subdivision, when officers confronted them with their guns drawn. Tall Timbers is a fairly affluent neighborhood, where Armand’s brother is a resident. The brother reported that a female officer fired two shots at them.

Campbell also tell us, ”He was not armed. After the first [shot], Armand started running toward his brother’s home. He was fired upon again as he was running. I’m unclear about whether he was in car when first shot was fired, but he was close to the car when the first shot happened.”

The story was first reported on Monday, which had a bare bones report that an “officer needs assistance” call was placed on the 3700 block of Mimosa Ct. in Algiers, a community in New Orleans. The NOPD reported an officer, recently identified as Officer Lisa Lewis, suffered a minor injury to her right hand during a scuffle with a combative suspect around 1:30 a.m. Details were not released that anyone had been shot or what the confrontation was about.

Campbell said there is an ongoing investigation into her client’s ordeal. At this time, Bennett has been charged with five outstanding warrants, including illegal possession of a weapon, resisting an officer (Gretna, LA), resisting an officer (New Orleans), possession of marijuana, and criminal damage to property, according to WWLTV.

A public records request for information fell on deaf ears over at the NOPD until Wednesday evening when the following statement was released:

On Sunday, August 10, 2014, around 1:19 a.m., a Fourth District NOPD officer was conducting a traffic stop in the 3700 block of Mimosa Drive. During the traffic stop, the officer was injured and the suspect, 26-year-old Armand Bennett was shot.

New Orleans Police Department Superintendent Ronal Serpas publicly apologized on Wednesday for taking two days to release details about the shooting. “In this particular case it’s a complete snafu on the part of my team. I take responsibility for it, I apologize for it, and I don’t want it to happen again,” said Serpas. He said that a press release was prepared on Monday, but somehow slipped through the cracks.

“I find it simply unacceptable to you and to the public that our office failed to get the information out,” Serpas added.

After the information was made public Wednesday evening,  Campbell had this to say via email, “Normally traffic stops do not include officers approaching the car with guns drawn. [The NOPD] Chief cannot decide if it was a traffic stop or if [the] officer stopped my client because she was aware of [the] outstanding warrant.”

She continues, “According to my client and his brother, there was no tussle, wrestling, or physical altercation with my client and the officer. They totally dispute the statement made by the chief.”

Photo credit: Bennett Family

Source

Please spread this..

(via thebluelip-blondie)

“If you want to accuse me of ‘playing the race card’, then let’s all agree that white privilege is the ultimate royal flush.”
— Franchesca “ChescaLeigh” Ramsay, I Don’t Want To Be Afraid of the Police (via compasswaters)

(via chescaleigh)

blackfashion:

Johanesburg, South Africa

http://everydaypeoplestories.tumblr.com/

Photo By | Cedric Nzaka

Instagram | @everydaypeoplestories

Twitter| @Cedric_Nzaka

Anti Blackness in India: My friend tells me (for the second time) that he was rejected for a marriage proposal because his skin is too dark.